Year One Courses

INTRO WEEK

Duration:  1 week; August

The Introduction week introduces the new students to the new curriculum and what to expect in terms of academics, expectations of student ethics, behaviors and studying, and gives them an experience of what their courses will be like in the first and second years.


 

FOUNDATIONS

Module 1: Molecules, Cells & Systems (MCS)

Duration: 10 weeks; Aug-Oct

Foundations 1 is the first block in the curriculum that provides a foundation in biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, pharmacology, physiology and data analysis.  Each of the 8 weeks in the first block represents a different theme: Biological Molecules; Chromosomes & Disease; Energy Metabolism & Physiology; Integration of Metabolism; Mechanisms of Cell Tissue Communication; Basic Endocrinology/Pharmacology; Autonomic Physiology, Muscle Histology & physiology; Epidemiology & Biostatistics. 

Module 2: Hematology, Immunology & Infectious Disease (HIID)

Duration: 12 weeks; Oct - Jan

Foundations 2 presents a framework upon which students may build a comprehensive understanding of the body’s response to various disease processes. The course is divided into four units: principles and concepts of hematology (both normal and pathological); basic immunology and inflammation (acute and chronic); physiology, genetics and pathogenesis of bacteria; physiology, genetics and pathogenesis of fungi, parasites and viruses.

 


 

MUSCULOSKELETAL, SKIN & RHEUMATOLOGY SYSTEMS

Duration:  4 weeks; Feb

This course will introduce students to the anatomy, histology, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, pathology, and medical management of the musculoskeletal and integumentary systems. In addition, rheumatologic diseases will be introduced.

This course will focus on the normal biology and function of the musculoskeletal and integumentary systems while describing the most common diseases of these systems. Not all human diseases will be covered. Clinical cases and clinical management related to these systems will be introduced at a level appropriate for first and second year medical students.

 

 


 

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

Duration:  5 weeks; Feb - April 

This course is designed to provide students with an essential knowledge of cardiovascular function as it relates to disease processes, treatment and the general practice of medicine.

The objective of this course is to provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge of the cardiovascular system. This 5-week block will integrate key topics in anatomy, biochemistry, biostatistics/epidemiology, embryology, histology, physiology, pathology, pharmacology and nutrition.


 

PULMONARY SYSTEM

Duration:  5 weeks; April – May 

In this block, the fundamentals of pulmonary physiology and anatomy serve as the basis for understanding conditions affecting the respiratory system. In addition, this block covers how the lungs interact with other major organ systems in normal and disease states.

The goal of this block is to provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge of the respiratory system to serve as a foundation for the clinical years. This block will integrate key topics in anatomy, physiology, embryology, histology, biochemistry, pathology, pharmacology, immunology, microbiology, oncogenesis and host defense. Basic science and clinical medicine will be integrated to explain normal and disease states. The diagnosis and treatment of common pulmonary disorders will be reviewed.


 

RENAL SYSTEM

Duration:  3 weeks; May 

The purpose of this block is to teach the students the normal functions and the disease processes affecting the kidney and its involvement in compensating for and causing electrolyte disorders. We believe that thorough understanding of the role the kidneys play in maintaining homeostasis is indispensible for general medical practice as well as for understanding many commonly used therapeutic modalities.

The objective of this course is to provide the preclinical student with a comprehensive overview of the renal system to serve as a foundation for the clinical years. The course content will familiarize the student with the structures and functions of the human renal system and on how they are altered by various conditions. Topics will include anatomy, physiology, embryology, histology, biochemistry, pathology, pharmacology and microbiology.  In addition, common disorders of the kidney and urinary tract that are encountered in every day practice, their diagnoses and treatment, will be reviewed.